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Posts Tagged ‘Bruno Conti’

I could spend several hours waffling about my admiration for Francesco Totti (and I probably will before Roma “week” is done) but my research has helped my uncover a host of Roma legends who I hadn’t even heard of before. Here are a few notable names I’ve discovered along the way.

Bruno Conti

One of the most popular players in Giallorossi history, Conti’s legendary status is only matched by Totti’s. Born in the Roman province of Nettuno, Conti stayed with Roma his entire career (interrupted only by two loan spells at Genoa) and made a total of 304 league appearances in 17 years with his hometown club.

A jet-heeled left-winger of great guile and crossing ability, Conti came through Roma’s youth system to make a name for himself. He’s widely considered one of the best wingers of his generation, and won a Scudetto and four Coppa Italias during his domestic playing career. He was also an international success, and played a key role in Italy’s 1982 World Cup triumph.

Success, however, didn’t come easy for Conti. He debuted aged 18 but struggled to hold down a regular first team place for years. Many derided him for his tiny stature (Conti is just 5’6”) but two seasons spent with Genoa in Serie B helped him greatly. Nils Liedholm was in-charge when Conti returned, and he established himself as a real franchise player in the 1980s.

Conti is still with Roma today and currently works as the club’s director of football. Aged 56, Conti has also worked with the Giallorossi youth team and as a caretaker manager in the past decade. His legendary status ensure he’ll have a job for life.

 

Roberto Pruzzo

Nicknamed “Il Bomber”, Pruzzo was Roma’s top scorer for seven consecutive seasons from 1979 to 1986. His trophy haul is identical to Conti’s, and his 136 goals in 315 appearances make him Roma’s second all-time top scorer.

Born in Genoa, Pruzzo signed from his hometown side for an Italian record 3m lira in 1978. Totti has since usurped him as Roma’s leading goalscorer, but Pruzzo was incredibly prolific for Roma for several seasons. He finished three seasons as Serie A’s top goalscorer while with the capital club but only accumulated a paltry six Azzurri caps in his career. Pruzzo retired in 1989 after a single season with Fiorentina.

 

Agostino Di Bartolomei

Playing in the same Roma side as Conti and Pruzzo, “DiBa” was born and raised in the eternal city. A product of the youth system, Agostino made his first Giallorossi appearance in 1972 but, like Conti, struggled to make an additional breakthrough. He spent a year on loan with Vicenza before really making the breakthrough in 1976.

DiBa was a natural leader, and captained Roma during their Scudetto-winning season in 82-83. Vision, technique, passing ability and determination were his key attributes and he played with an almost perfect combination of grit and finesse. He’s considered one of the Giallorossi’s greatest ever captains and never gave anything less than 100% for the team he loved.

Sven-Goran Eriksson’s 1984 sale of DiBa to Milan sparked protests around the capital: the player never wanted to leave, and the fans were shocked to see him go. In hindsight, however, it might’ve been the correct decision. Agostino was never the same after leaving Roma and his career slowly petered out at Cesena and Salernitana. DiBa, a lifelong depression victim, tragically committed suicide in 1994.

 

Giacomo Losi

Losi’s 450 appearances make him Roma’s second all-time appearance leader (after, you guessed it, Totti). He captained the Giallorossi for nine seasons from 1959 to 1968 and won three trophies at Roma (two Coppa Italias and the Inter Cities Fairs Cup).

More of a club legend than a national hero, Losi nonetheless picked-up 11 Azzurri caps in his career. He played as a full-back and his clean-but-strong defender style saw him pick-up just a single booking in his 14-year career. Born in Soncino, Lodi became a true Giallorossi hero in 1961 when he played almost a whole match against Sampdoria injured, even scoring the winner. He still lives in Rome to this day and occupies himself as a director of non-league Valle Aurelia 87.

 

Giuseppe Giannini

A precursor to Totti as a symbol of Roma, Giannini played for the club from 1981-96 and, like Losi, captained the Giallorossi for nine seasons. He was an attacking midfielder who scored 49 goals in 318 Roma appearances, winning three Coppa Italias and 47 Italy caps along the way.

Giannini earned instant favour by opting to sign for Roma ahead of rivals Lazio, and was nicknamed “Il Principe” (the prince) for his grace and elegance on the pitch. Retiring in 1998, Giannini is still only 47 and has managed a series of lower-level clubs (including Foggia and Verona) since 2004.

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Liverpool's 1984 European Cup win in Rome was a catalyst for violence.

Turns out AS Roma don’t exactly enjoy the most harmonious relationship with English fans, and understandably so. Seeing “Liverpool” listed as one of Roma’s rivals in Football Manager (guffaw) first raised my interest. I personally find Liverpool to be one of the game’s most dislikeable clubs (especially at this point in time) but, a couple of unfavourable European ties aside, why would Roma and the Anfield Reds care about each other?

A little bit of research unearths an understandable explanation. I’ve heard of a link between city rivals Lazio and Chelsea, but the crux of the rivalry stems from the 1984 European Cup final. The game took place in Roma’s Stadio Olimpico with Liverpool besting the hometown side 4-2 on penalties after a 1-1 finish AET.

Roma, the pre-match favourites, had been humiliated on their own turf. Bruno Conti and Francesco Graziani lost their composure and skied the decisive spots kicks, leaving Giallorossi fans to suffer the indignation of watching an opposing team lift Europe’s most prestigious trophy inside their own stadium.

As unpleasant as this situation must’ve been, however, there are far darker reasons for the rivalry’s birth. Localised rioting ensued after the game and a handful of Liverpool fans were unfortunately caught-up in the violence. The celebrations were ruined, but, more importantly, a number of Liverpool fans were hospitalised as a result.

Mark Lawrenson penned an eye-opening recollection of the situation in 2007. He alleges that Liverpool fans were corralled down a tunnel towards a horde of Roman hooligans, who viciously beat the visitors as the idle police watched-on. You’ve got to take such a piece with a big pinch of salt, but it sounds horrific. I’m sure that Lawrenson, a Liverpool great, exaggerated much of his tale, but all football violence is disgusting and completely unjustifiable.

This makes the bad blood pretty clear. If my team’s support ever fell victim to such violence I’m sure I’d resent the offenders too. It only takes a quick Google search to show that Liverpool fans still loathe their Roman counterparts, and sects of the Giallorossi supportership have done little to endear themselves in subsequent ties with English teams.

Liverpool visited Roma twice in 2001 and there were further stabbings. Middlesbrough visited the Eternal City as part of their 2006 UEFA Cup campaign and their fans became embroiled in trouble with local ultras. Further incidents followed after Manchester United’s visit in 2007 and an Arsenal supporters’ coach was set upon in 2009.

It’d be completely wrong to sympathise with the perpetrators of such violence. Hooliganism, unfortunately, remains a significant problem on the peninsula, and its eradication will take years of hard work. However, there’s no way that the English supporters are completely blameless. Finding unbiased, English-language reports on these incidents has been difficult for obvious reasons. Yes, the Giallorossi have a significant hooligan sect, but it’s wrong to tar every Roma fan with the same brush.

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Associazione Sportiva Roma were founded in 1927 as the result of a merger between three existing Roman clubs: Roman F.C., Alba-Audace Roma and Fortitudo Pro Roma. Italo Foschi, a secretary for the National Fascist Party, who wanted Rome to have a larger club to challenge dominant northern sides like Genoa and Pro Vercelli, initiated the merger.

The club settled in the working class region of Testaccio, building an all-wooden stadium there (the Campo Testaccio) in 1929. Thrown straight into the top tier, Roma didn’t become a success side until Serie A’s second official season (1930-31). A team featuring Italian internationals like Fulvio Bernardini (who I covered a few weeks ago) and Attilio Ferraris finished second to Juventus, preceding a credible third-place finish in 1931-32.

A slump in league form saw most of Roma’s high-profile players depart, and they were forced into a rebuilding process in the mid-1930s. Enrique Guaita, an Argentine-born forward, was among those who joined, and his goals helped fire Roma back towards the top. In 1935-36, coached by the Scudetto-winning ex-Casale player Luigi Barbesino, Roma finished second to Bologna by just a single point.

Goal-getter: Amedeo Amadei.

Roma’s inconsistency resurfaced and the Giallorossi (“yellow-reds”) finished as low as 10th the following season. Their first title win in 1941-42 came as a huge surprise, as the capital city side had finished 11th the year before despite making the Coppa Italia final. 18 goals from star striker Amedeo Amadei helped Roma to a three-point advantage over runners-up Torino.

Again Roma struggled to establish dominance. They finished 9th a year after winning the title and continued to struggle after Serie A’s post-World War II resumption in 1946. They went into a slump, never finishing above 15th between 1946 and 1951. They were relegated after a wretched 1950-51 campaign saw them finished 19th, although the league was tight and they were just seven points behind ninth-place Udinese.

The Serie A exodus didn’t last long, however, and Roma won promotion at the first time of asking under future Azzurri coach Giuseppe Viani’s tutelage. 1951-52 remains Roma’s only season outside of the top flight to date.

The Giallorossi slowly re-established themselves as a top-half side, and achieved yet another second-place finish in 1954-55 with Englishman Jesse Carver at the helm. Originally Roma had finished third, but they were bumped to runners-up when second-place Udinese were relegated after a betting scandal.

Unable to establish themselves as one of Italy’s top sides, Roma’s up-and-down Serie A fortunes continued. They did achieve some success in cup competitions, however, and won the 1961 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup (a precursor to the UEFA Cup/Europa League). They beat Birimingham City 4-2 in the final, and won their first Coppa Italia three years later with a win over Torino.

A second Coppa Italia followed in 1969 as Roma continued to fluctuate around Serie A’s midtable. The 1970s were just as successful on the cup front, but Roma never finished above third in Serie A. During this period they added the 1972 Anglo-Italian Cup and 1979-80 Coppa Italia to their trophy room, before finishing as Serie A’s runners-up in 1980-81.

Bruno Conti, an exceptionally quick and skilful winger, was among Roma’s star players at the time. His Roma career lasted from 1973 to 1990, and he even managed the club after Luigi Delneri’s departure in the 2004-05 season. Conti made a total of 372 Serie A appearances in his career and won 47 Italy caps, scoring five goals. Today he works as Roma’s Director of Football.

The Giallorossi had been within touching distance of the Scudetto on plenty of occasions, and the hunger for gold was returning. The Eternal City exploded into celebration at the end of the 1982-83 season when a dominant Roma side won Serie A with games to spare.

Roma were unable to repeat the feat in 1983-84, finishing second, but they did manage to win the 1984 Coppa Italia. They also competed in the 1984 European Cup (Champions League) final, taking a feared and respected Liverpool side to a penalty shootout that the English side went on to win.

Yet another Coppa Italia win came in 1985-86, but Roma’s league form was slumping again. By 1991 they’d added another Coppa Italia and put forth a losing effort in that year’s UEFA Cup final, but Roma were regularly finishing 8th and 9th in Serie A. To this day they’ve never been able to establish themselves as the number one side in Italy, often following-up Scudetto victories with season of mediocrity.

The 2000s marked a shift in Roma’s fortunes as the club splashed-out on big money signings like Gabriel Batistuta, Hidetoshi Nakata, Walter Samuel and Brazilian midfielder Emerson. 2000-01 was hugely successful, and Roma won their third Scudetto with a 3-1 last-day win over Parma.

Roman hero: Francesco Totti.

Captain and local hero Francesco Totti emerged as a true Roman icon around this time, and his performances were instrumental in the club’s success. I don’t even need to explain the phenomenon that Totti has become. He’s a unique player, one of the finest of his generation, and one that the Giallorossi will struggle to replace when he leaves or retires.

Roma continued to spend big. Aldair, Cafu, and Vincenzo Montella had already arrived at the club, and enfant terrible Antonio Cassano signed for €30 the following season. The Giallorossi finished second in 2001-02, missing out on a fourth Scudetto by a single point, but did capture that year’s Supercoppa.

Big financial troubles surfaced in 2002-03, an inevitable result of the previous couple of seasons’ big spending. Batistuta was loaned to Inter to cover his wages, and Cafu was released to AC Milan. Christian Chivu’s 2003 signing was delayed and only secured by the FIGC’s own money. Roma, however, slowly recovered. More shares were released onto the stock market, and approximately €80m was injected into the club in order to keep it afloat.

Roma have continued as calcio’s perennial nearly men ever since. They’ve won a further two Coppa Italia’s since 2003 and finished as Serie A runners-up an astonishing five times. This season they’ve undergoing something of a revolution under new American owner Thomas Di Benedetto and manager Luis Enrique. The transition to a slick, possession-based team hasn’t been easy, but things are finally starting to pick up for Roma. I’ll have more on that tomorrow.

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