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Posts Tagged ‘Enrico Chiesa’

I was always going to give Enrico Chiesa some props this week. Sure, Gianfranco Zola and Hernan Crespo were probably better players, but I had too much fun watching Enrico when I was younger to pick either of them over him. Besides, I mostly know Zola from his time with Chelsea and there’s only so much I can say about his Parma career. Crespo? A great goalscorer, no doubt, but nowhere near as eye-catching or exciting to watch.

I’m going to try and keep this as concise as possible. Over-analysing Chiesa would only dilute the pure, unbridled joy I still get from watching old footage of him playing, and I really don’t want to do that. For me, watching Chiesa playing (and scoring) was pure entertainment. It was all about great moves and great goals. Some of the goals this guy scored were just perfect. Long-range drives, delicate chips, volleys, headers, toe pokes: Enrico scored them all. He was a great goalscorer and a scorer of great goals, and there aren’t many other strikers who can say that.

One goal that I always remember is Chiesa’s wonderstrike in the 1999 UEFA Cup final. Parma were already 2-0 up against French giants Marseille after goals from Crespo and Paolo Vanoli. Juan Sebastian Veron took the ball up the right flank in the 55th minute. 30 yards from goal, Veron chipped the ball towards the box. Crespo’s dummy foxed Laurent Blanc and the ball fell perfectly for Chiesa to rifle a perfect volley into the top corner from 15 yards.

The above video encapsulates everything that Enrico Chiesa was about for me. Those great, great goals. Those astonishing moments of beauty that draw us to the sport in the first place. Chiesa’s goals for Parma, Fiorentina and Sampdoria played a huge role in getting me interested in calcio in the first place, and he didn’t score many better (or more significant) than the above.

Once described as playing like “a cross between Paolo Rossi and Gigi Riva,” Chiesa was an incredibly well-rounded striker. Capable of playing advanced and dropping deep, he moved quickly and had a cannon of a right foot. When the ball landed at Chiesa’s feet you knew something exciting was going to happen. He was a game-changing forward who could turn a game’s tide in a split second, and that’s what made him so special. Enrico wasn’t a perfect player, but few could light a stadium up like him in his prime.

He played for the Gialloblu for a total of three seasons, scoring 33 goals in 92 Serie A appearances and countless more in Europe (he scored 8 in Parma’s 1998-99 UEFA Cup run alone) and domestic cups. During his time at the Stadio Tardini he broke into the Italy squad, scoring a credible 7 goals in 17 Azzurri appearances. He left Parma for Fiorentina in 1999, and had further spells with Lazio, Siena and Figline before retiring last year at the ripe old age of 40.

Chiesa is currently enrolled in a coaching course at Coverciano, the famed Italian football education centre. I can only hope that the teams Chiesa goes on to manager play with the same zest and exuberance as Enrico in his pomp.

I could waste another 500 words rambling about Enrico and his career but I’d rather not. Instead lets just sit back, relax and watch the great man doing what he did best: score goals.

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Il Capitano: can anybody name me a better centre-back?

 

I’ve had a soft spot for Parma ever since I started watching Italian football in the nineties. Though I’m a tad young to remember most of the Nevio Scala era, I have some vivid recollections of some of the great teams and players the Gialloblu used to have. Fabio Cannavaro is probably my favourite defender of all-time, Gianfranco Zola is the best foreign player I’ve ever seen playing in England and Massimo Crippa introduced me to the value of a “hard-man” midfielder. Then there’s Lilliam Thuram, Enrico Chiesa, Gigi Buffon, Alessandro Melli, Tino Asprilla…

It would be wrong to call myself a Parma supporter: they, like Napoli and Hellas Verona, are just one of a number of Italian teams I’m particularly fond of. I don’t actively follow them and I don’t pretend to have any real loyalty to them, but I usually cheer when I see them doing well. I was genuinely gutted when they almost went out of business a few years ago. Parma were a huge part of my football education, so it’s good to see them back in Serie A under Thomas Ghirardi’s ownership.

Parma’s name always pops into my head when I think of “big” Italian clubs, even though they’re small fries compared to the likes of Inter and Juve. They were just so good in the nineties, and I haven’t really been able to shake that from my head despite their recent misfortunes (and stint in Serie B). It’s testament to the greatness of those old sides that I will always consider Parma one of the greatest Italian clubs.

They’ve never Serie A but boy did they come close. Parma were runners-up in 1996-97 and rarely finished outside the top six. In addition they’ve won the Coppa Italia thrice (91-92, 98-99, 01-02), the Supercoppa once (1999) the UEFA Cup twice (94-95, 98-99), the Cup Winners Cup (RIP) (92-93) and the European Super Cup (1993). An impressive record, and one that I hope they can add to in the future.

This week is going to be pretty self-indulgent. I’m going to spend a lot of time revisiting the good old days and profiling some of the prominent figures from this time period. I don’t want to completely neglect the Parma of today, but there are so many good memories to look back on.

Starting tomorrow I’ll be taking a closer look at some of my favourite Parma players, teams and managers. I’ve no idea how many I’ll get through but there are literally dozens of things I want to write about this week. Lets see how I do.

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