Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Parma’

It’s been a good week despite the over-run. Parma have probably been the most enjoyable club to study thus far. In hindsight I would’ve liked to have touched more on their European triumphs and fall from grace in the 2000′ rather than using my knowledge of ’90’s Parma as a crutch, but I’ve had great fun reminiscing on so many great memories. Some of the squads Parma had in the ’90’s were just ridiculous, and it’s amazing that such a high volume of top notch players passed through the Tardini during that time period.

I could easily have spent another week writing about Parma, but I’ve got to move forward to this week’s feature club.

Genoa have always intrigued me in the same way as Torino. They’ve won Serie A and have a very rich history, but that’s about all I know. They weren’t particularly successful during the formative stages of my calcio eduction, so I’m not as knowledgeable on them as I am Parma, for example. There’s so much information available on their history that I should be able to sufficiently educate myself this week.

One thing I find particularly interesting is Genoa’s apparent “English roots”. Honestly, I don’t have a clue what that means, but, as a Brit, I’m really looking forward to finding out.

Stay tuned!

Read Full Post »

I was always going to give Enrico Chiesa some props this week. Sure, Gianfranco Zola and Hernan Crespo were probably better players, but I had too much fun watching Enrico when I was younger to pick either of them over him. Besides, I mostly know Zola from his time with Chelsea and there’s only so much I can say about his Parma career. Crespo? A great goalscorer, no doubt, but nowhere near as eye-catching or exciting to watch.

I’m going to try and keep this as concise as possible. Over-analysing Chiesa would only dilute the pure, unbridled joy I still get from watching old footage of him playing, and I really don’t want to do that. For me, watching Chiesa playing (and scoring) was pure entertainment. It was all about great moves and great goals. Some of the goals this guy scored were just perfect. Long-range drives, delicate chips, volleys, headers, toe pokes: Enrico scored them all. He was a great goalscorer and a scorer of great goals, and there aren’t many other strikers who can say that.

One goal that I always remember is Chiesa’s wonderstrike in the 1999 UEFA Cup final. Parma were already 2-0 up against French giants Marseille after goals from Crespo and Paolo Vanoli. Juan Sebastian Veron took the ball up the right flank in the 55th minute. 30 yards from goal, Veron chipped the ball towards the box. Crespo’s dummy foxed Laurent Blanc and the ball fell perfectly for Chiesa to rifle a perfect volley into the top corner from 15 yards.

The above video encapsulates everything that Enrico Chiesa was about for me. Those great, great goals. Those astonishing moments of beauty that draw us to the sport in the first place. Chiesa’s goals for Parma, Fiorentina and Sampdoria played a huge role in getting me interested in calcio in the first place, and he didn’t score many better (or more significant) than the above.

Once described as playing like “a cross between Paolo Rossi and Gigi Riva,” Chiesa was an incredibly well-rounded striker. Capable of playing advanced and dropping deep, he moved quickly and had a cannon of a right foot. When the ball landed at Chiesa’s feet you knew something exciting was going to happen. He was a game-changing forward who could turn a game’s tide in a split second, and that’s what made him so special. Enrico wasn’t a perfect player, but few could light a stadium up like him in his prime.

He played for the Gialloblu for a total of three seasons, scoring 33 goals in 92 Serie A appearances and countless more in Europe (he scored 8 in Parma’s 1998-99 UEFA Cup run alone) and domestic cups. During his time at the Stadio Tardini he broke into the Italy squad, scoring a credible 7 goals in 17 Azzurri appearances. He left Parma for Fiorentina in 1999, and had further spells with Lazio, Siena and Figline before retiring last year at the ripe old age of 40.

Chiesa is currently enrolled in a coaching course at Coverciano, the famed Italian football education centre. I can only hope that the teams Chiesa goes on to manager play with the same zest and exuberance as Enrico in his pomp.

I could waste another 500 words rambling about Enrico and his career but I’d rather not. Instead lets just sit back, relax and watch the great man doing what he did best: score goals.

Read Full Post »

There are plenty of great Gialloblu midfielders I could’ve dedicated an individual profile. Juan Sebastian Veron only spent a single season with Parma but he was an excellent playmaker and I’d love to analysis and break his playing style down. Massimo Crippa, the tough-tackling achorman, was one of my favourite Italian players growing-up, and what about Dino Baggio? Stefano Fiore? Diego Fuser?

As good as these players were, none captured my imagination quite like Tomas Brolin. The Swede played for Parma from 1990-95 and again in 1997, so I didn’t see him play as much as Baggio or Crippa, but I was often dazzled by what I saw of him. Brolin was a great player in his pomp, and his story is both sad and fascinating.

Spending his career’s formative years in his native Sweden, Brolin shot to international prominence a series of impressive performances at Italia ’90. Brolin’s club, IFK Norrkoping, were soon inundated with phone calls from potential suitors. In the end newly promoted Parma won the bidding war, and Tomas signed for the Gialloblu in a £1.2m deal later that summer.

Brolin started his Parma career as a deep-lying forward and quickly forged a productive striker partnership with Alessandro Melli, a more advanced striker. The two scored 20 goals between them in Parma’s first-ever season of top-flight football, helping propel the Gialloblu to a 5th-place finish and European qualification. 1991-92 was even more fruitful: Parma finished 6th in Serie A and beat Juventus 2-1 on aggregate to win the Coppa Italia (the first major trophy in the club’s history).

As successful as these two seasons were, the next two were the making of Brolin. Faustino Asprilla, the sporadically brilliant Columbian (and cult hero of mine, as a Newcastle supporter), joined Parma in the summer of 1992 and many expected him to take Brolin’s place in the starting XI. Brolin was benched in favour of Asprilla for most of 1992-93, but an injury ruled the Columbian out of the Cup Winners Cup final. Brolin grabbed his opportunity with both hands and performed well, helping Parma to a 3-1 win over Royal Antwerp.

Future legend Gianfranco Zola signed for Parma the following summer and it widely assumed that the Swede’s days were numbered. Nevio Scala, however, had an ace up his sleeve. The coach, having seen the benefits of playing Brolin in midfield in 92-93, pulled Brolin even deeper and positioned him centrally in a 3-man midfield with Crippa and Gabriele Pin.

Brolin thrived in his new role and was handed his former strike partner Melli’s number 7 shirt. Still only 23, Brolin reinvented himself as a playmaker. His technique, quality on the ball and passing ability made him a great candidate for the role, and his performances as a pseudo-regista helped Parma to another Cup Winners Cup final in 1994 (sadly, they lost 1-0 to Arsenal).

Tomas was in the best shape of his life by the time the 1994 World Cup came around. Playing as a striker (as he always did for his country), Brolin was one of the stars of the tournament. His grinta was vital to an unfancied Sweden side as they battled their way to a fantastic 3rd-place finish after victories over Russia, Saudi Arabia, Romania and Bulgaria, and a group stage draw with eventual champions Brazil.

Brolin scored 3 goals at USA ’94 and was the only Swede to be named in the All-Star team. Tomas had the world at his feet, and there were rumours of him moving to Barcelona as Hristo Stoichkov’s replacement. Despite the Catalans’ interest, Brolin opted to stick with Parma with the belief that they could mount a serious title charge in 94-95.

Sadly, this is where things start to fall apart. On November 16th 1994, Tomas Brolin broke his foot during a Euro ’96 qualifier in Stockholm. Parma were 2 points clear at the top of Serie A when Brolin sustained the injury and they suffered badly in his absence. The Swede eventually returned in April 1995 with his team 8 points adrift of league leaders Juventus. He made his return start for Parma on the 7th May in the absence of Gianfranco Zola and struggled for form and fitness for the rest of the season, failing to complete 90 minutes once. To compound his misery, Brolin was sent-off against Napoli on the last day of the season and Juventus took the Scudetto.

The Swede faced a long, arduous summer. Tasked with recovering his fitness and keeping new signing Stoichkov out of the team, Brolin scored two pre-season goals but Scala saw little improvement in his fitness level. Brolin was dropped for Massimo Bambrilla and never reclaimed his place. Struggling for form, fitness and confidence, Tomas Brolin had fallen out of the loop at Parma.

It was time to move on. Leeds United swooped to sign Brolin on a two and a half year deal and the Swede made his debut a day later at Newcastle. After battling his way into the Leeds XI, Brolin turned in a vintage performance against Manchester United on December 24th, 1995. Even Eric Cantona looked second-class as Tomas tormented the Reds’ defence all evening: Leeds won 3-1 with Brolin having a hand in every goal.

Things seemed to be looking up for Brolin and a good start at Leeds had yielded 4 goals from 8 Premier League games. Things turned sour in January 1996: Leeds were thrashed 5-0 by Liverpool and manager Howard Wilkinson chose to point the finger at Brolin, labelling the forward “lazy” and criticising his defensive contribution.

Things never really improved between Wilkinson and Brolin. Tomas was eventually loaned to FC Zurich after failing to report for pre-season training, but returned to Leeds shortly after Wilkinson was replaced with George Graham. Brolin, however, refused to go back to Elland Road, and only accepted his recall when threatened with legal action by his parent club.

Injuries continued to plague Brolin. A metal staple inserted into his ankle during an scar tissue-removal operation earlier in 1996 scuppered a move to Sampdoria. Oblivious to the staple’s existence, Leeds called Brolin back to Yorkshire to have the injury properly examined amidst fears that his playing career might have reached a premature end. Brolin never played to Leeds again, and was eventually loaned back to Parma in December.

His return to the Stadio Tardini was fruitless, with Brolin restricted mostly to brief cameos and substitute appearances. The Gialloblu decided not to renew the Swede’s deal and he returned to Leeds, only to have his contract terminated in October 1997 for skipping a match without prior permission.

Brolin at Palace: a shadow of his former self.

A free agent for the first time in his career, Brolin wasn’t exactly hot property but managed to secure a deal with Crystal Palace. His spell with the Eagles was every bit as shambolic as his time at Leeds. Brolin failed to score in 13 Palace appearances. By this point he was visibly overweight, completely out of form and a sad shadow of his former sense. He retired in August 1998 aged just 29.

It’s a huge shame that Brolin’s career panned out the way it did. He was once a wonderful player with all the potential in the world, but he never truly recovered from that first injury. Excellent in his first Parma spell and brilliant for the Swedish national side, Brolin was, in 2003, voted Leeds United’s “worst ever signing” in a BBC poll. Few players have fallen quite as far as Brolin, but his conduct at Leeds and Palace didn’t exactly do him any favours.

Most British football fans remember Tomas Brolin as an overweight flop, but not me. His time in Britain was an unmitigated disaster, but Brolin’s brief boom at Parma was absolutely thrilling. A midfield maestro for Parma and a deadly marksman for his country, I choose to remember Tomas Brolin, the wonderkid, not Tomas Brolin, podgy waster.

Read Full Post »

It shouldn’t be a surprise to anybody who read yesterday’s post on Fabio Cannavaro that the former Italy captain is my favourite player of 1990’s-era Parma. But Cannavaro, as good as he was, played as part of one of the tightest defences in the country and the other players who comprised this unit deserve some praise too.

Players such as Lorenzo Minotti deserve a shout here too, but their peak years were before my time (I’m 23) and I didn’t see enough of them to be able to write about their careers. Regardless, here, in short-form, are a few of my favourite Parma defenders.

Antonio Benarrivo

Benarrivo played for Parma from 1991 to 2004 and he is Parma’s all-time appearance leader with over 300 games to his name (all competitions). He holds the honour of being the only player who was at the club for all eight of their major trophy wins, and he collected UEFA Cup (x2), European Super Cup, Cup Winners’ Cup, Coppa Italia (x3) and Supercoppa winners’ medals at the Stadio Tardini.

A marauding full-back capable of playing on either flank, Benarrivo won 23 caps for Itally from 1993-97, and was widely considered one of the best full-backs on the peninsula during his peak years. Quick, athletic and full of energy, Benarrivo shuttled up-and-down the wing as a classic wingback in Parma’s 5-3-2 system, but physicality was far from his own strength. Benarrivo had excellent technique and was so comfortable with the ball at his feet that he was often employed as a winger.

Just as Cannavaro introduced me to the concept of intelligent defending, Benarrivo taught me everything I know about attacking full-backs. He was a vital outlet for Parma over the years and I used to love watching him bombing forward and giving opposition defenders nightmares on Sunday afternoons. It’s just a shame that he had players like Christian Panucci ahead of him in the Azzurri pecking order.

Lilian Thuram

One of the classiest defenders to ever play the game, Thuram made over 600 appearances in a glittering career that included spells with Monaco, Juventus, Barcelona and, of course, Parma. He appeared 163 times in 5 seasons with Parma, scoring just once, and was eventually sold to Juventus for £22m in 2001.

Thuram wasn’t just a good defender: he was a good footballer. His timing and superior positioning meant he rarely had to foul the opposition and he was very rarely booked. Equally adept at right-back or centre back, Thuram’s versatility, class and ability made him a stalwart for club and country, and he is France’s most-capped player of all-time having racked-up an astonishing 142 appearances for Les Bleus.

He’d go on to win an impressive list of honours elsewhere, but Thuram, like Cannavaro, really grew into a world-class player with Parma. He was rarely injured, almost never suspended and always a cut above the opposition. Remember when you were a kid and you and your friends would compile “dream teams” of your favourite players? Other positions would always chop and change, but I’d always have Thuram at RB and Cannavaro at CB. Fabio and Lillian would still be the first names on my team-sheet today.

Roberto Nestor Sensini

“Boquita” was one of Parma’s most important players during the ‘90’s “golden era”. I first took note of Sensini because of his appearance: at the time I thought he resembled the bastard offspring of David Platt and a salmon (I was 8 years old, cut me some slack…). Fishy appearance aside, Sensini was a very good defender. Though never as iconic as Cannavaro or as revered as Thuram, Sensini became a cult figure at the Stadio Tardini and not just because he was awesome in Championship Manager.

Sensini made over 200 Parma appearances in two separate spells with the club (1994-99, 2001-02).He was so fit that he was able to maintain a career in top-flight Italian football until the age of 39, and his composed playing style was a perfect match for Parma’s controlled defensive ethos. Having earned the affectionate nickname nonno (“grandfather”), Sensini retired in 2006 to embark on a managerial career.

More of a legend at Udinese than Parma, Sensini remains an important contributor to Parma’s success. Fingers crossed that he can recover after a poor start to his new career.

Honourable Mentions

Two Italian players often popped-up during this period: Roberto Mussi and Luigi Apolloni. My memory is a bit hazy when it come to these guys and I couldn’t really tell you much about their playing styles, but both were prominent in the ‘90’s and Apolloni made over 300 appearances for Parma. These names, along with Luigi Sartor, always come into my head when I think of Parma defenders.

Fernando Couto was only at Parma for a couple of seasons in the ‘90’s (he rejoined the Gialloblu in 2005) and probably played his best football elsewhere, but I have great memories of the long-haired Portuguese patrolling the penalty area. A solid defender and a huge threat from set pieces, Couto scored 4 goals in his spell at the Stadio Tardini.

Read Full Post »

It’s difficult for me to write an article about Fabio Cannavaro without filling the opening paragraph with superlatives. This is one of the all-time greats we’re talking about here: a great captain for club and country, my favourite defender and, more importantly, a Parma legend.

Joining from Napoli in 1995, Cannavaro made 289 appearances in 7 seasons with the Gialloblu, scoring 6 goals in the process. Cannavaro built his reputation as one of the world’s best central defenders during his time with Parma and the steps taken at the Stadio Tardini helped him accrue an enviable list of honours.

Fabio won two Serie A titles, two La Liga titles, the 2006 World Cup, the Ballon d’Or and the FIFA World Player of the Year award after leaving Parma in 2002, but I’m more concerned with his achievements at Parma (what with the title of this series being “Gialloblu Giants”). Cannavaro made 40+ appearances in 5 out of his 7 Parma seasons and never made less than thirty. He was an ever-present, an icon of consistency, a colossus

Cannavaro slotted straight into Parma’s XI and was immediately at home in Nevio Scala’s 5-3-2 formation. Leaving his hometown club Napoli was a huge wrench for Fabio, but the move paid-off big-time. The Gialloblu were already renowned for their sturdy defence and Cannavaro’s arrival further solidified their backline. This coupled with Scala’s sound defensive philosophies created the perfect environment for Fabio to grow into one of the all-time great centre-halves.

1995-96 wasn’t a great season for Parma. Cannavaro made 36 appearances in all competitions as the Gialloblu laboured to a 6th-place finish after finishing 3rd the season before. Things improved in 96-97 for both Parma and Cannavaro. Disappointing runs in the UEFA Cup and Coppa Italia saw Parma exit in the 3rd and 2nd rounds of those competitions, but they managed a 2nd-place Serie A position after drawing with Juventus on the closing day.

More significantly, January 1997 marked the start of a long and hugely successful international career. Cannavaro made his Azzurri bow in a friendly with Northern Ireland, and would go on to earn another 11 caps before the year’s end. A particularly notable performance came in a World Cup ’98 qualifier against England at Wembley. Cannavaro dominated Alan Shearer, then considered one of the best strikers in the world, for 90 minutes as Italy eeked-out a 1-0 win.

The next season was mostly fruitless for Parma as new coach Carlo Ancelotti could only guide them to another 6th-place finished. 98-99, however, was huge. The Gialloblu finished 4th in Serie A but won both the Coppa Italia and the UEFA Cup, beating Marseille 3-0 in the final. Parma’s record was hugely impressive in 98-99, but I’m going to hold the details for now as I plan on taking a look at their UEFA Cup winning sides later this week.

Doping allegations would sadly may Cannavaro’s 98-99 triumphs when Shady footage of the Parma captain receiving injections before the UEFA Cup final surfaced on the internet a few years later. The substance was later found to be Neoton (Phosphocreatine), a chemical commonly used to produce muscular energy. Neoton was not on the banned substance list and no action was taken, but the taint remains. Personally I see nothing wrong with an athlete using perfectly legal substances to enhance their performance before a big game, but c’est la vie.

Parma struggled to mount a serious title challenge after the highs of 98-99 and finished 5th the following season. They captured the Supercoppa in 99-00 and finished 4th in 2000-01 (reaching the Coppa Italia final along the way), before winning the Coppa Italia the following seasons despite a dismal finish of 10th in Serie A.

Sadly 2001-02 would be Cannavaro’s last at the Stadio Tardini as Fabio, now recognised as one of the world’s best defenders, left for Inter in a €23-million deal. Fabio pulled the curtain down on an illustrious career this summer after spells with Juventus (twice), Real Madrid and Al-Ahli Dubai. His international career continued until 2010, with his crowning glory being Italy’s 2006 World Cup win. Cannavaro put in a series of legacy-defining performances for the triumphant Azzurri, earning himself the nickname of “Wall of Berlin” after a particularly impressive showing in the final (held in Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, hence the nickname).

Not only did the 2006 World Cup secure Cannavaro’s place in Azzurri history but his world-class performances helped him capture the 2006 FIFA World Player of the Year and Ballon d’Or (European Footballer of the Year) awards. Impressively, Cannavaro was the first defender to win the latter since Lothar Matthaus in 1990, while he and the German sweeper remain the only to defensive players to ever be named World Player of the Year.

Writing a laundry list of Fabio Cannavaro’s accomplishments is all very well but it only tells half the story. I’ve spent plenty of time going over Fabio Cannavaro’s legacy, but what about Fabio Cannavaro the player? Everybody he was a great defender, but what made him one of the most celebrated centre-backs in history?

Some believe that crunching tackles, determination and desperate lunges are the prerequisite components of a great defender. I disagree completely. Of course defenders need to be determined and strong in the tackle, but there’s more to defending than that. I believe that composure, intelligence and elegance are just as important in defence as in attack, and Cannavaro was the perfect personification of all three.

I’ve never seen another defender who can read the game like Cannavaro. Just as Barcelona’s tiki-taka wizards can see passes that are just invisible to other players, Cannavaro could telegraph attacking moves before they’d even happened. He was a master of nipping attacks in the bud by cutting them off at the supply with blocks, interceptions and straightforward tackles.

Cannavaro’s career isn’t littered with frantic, last-gap challenges because he simply didn’t need to make them. His vision was so good that he was able to kill attacks before they became serious threats by exercising one of the sharpest defensive minds in the game. Cannavaro was strong, but he didn’t use his brawn to carry him through games: he, like most other great defenders of the modern era, used his brain.

Watching Fabio Cannavaro in his prime was always a pleasure, especially at the 2006 World Cup. Rarely eye-catching but always effective, Cannavaro was always in the right place and not by chance. He turned defending, football’s most destructive element, into a genuine thing of beauty, and for that he should be commended.

That is why I’ve always loved Cannavaro. Studying his style completely changed my perception of how a defender should play, and his success shows that you don’t have to be the biggest (Fabio was only 5’9”) or the toughest to be a top centre-back. I salute you, Il Capitano, and hope we soon see your like again.

… and hey, how many other defenders have had such a “charming” song written about them?

Read Full Post »

Il Capitano: can anybody name me a better centre-back?

 

I’ve had a soft spot for Parma ever since I started watching Italian football in the nineties. Though I’m a tad young to remember most of the Nevio Scala era, I have some vivid recollections of some of the great teams and players the Gialloblu used to have. Fabio Cannavaro is probably my favourite defender of all-time, Gianfranco Zola is the best foreign player I’ve ever seen playing in England and Massimo Crippa introduced me to the value of a “hard-man” midfielder. Then there’s Lilliam Thuram, Enrico Chiesa, Gigi Buffon, Alessandro Melli, Tino Asprilla…

It would be wrong to call myself a Parma supporter: they, like Napoli and Hellas Verona, are just one of a number of Italian teams I’m particularly fond of. I don’t actively follow them and I don’t pretend to have any real loyalty to them, but I usually cheer when I see them doing well. I was genuinely gutted when they almost went out of business a few years ago. Parma were a huge part of my football education, so it’s good to see them back in Serie A under Thomas Ghirardi’s ownership.

Parma’s name always pops into my head when I think of “big” Italian clubs, even though they’re small fries compared to the likes of Inter and Juve. They were just so good in the nineties, and I haven’t really been able to shake that from my head despite their recent misfortunes (and stint in Serie B). It’s testament to the greatness of those old sides that I will always consider Parma one of the greatest Italian clubs.

They’ve never Serie A but boy did they come close. Parma were runners-up in 1996-97 and rarely finished outside the top six. In addition they’ve won the Coppa Italia thrice (91-92, 98-99, 01-02), the Supercoppa once (1999) the UEFA Cup twice (94-95, 98-99), the Cup Winners Cup (RIP) (92-93) and the European Super Cup (1993). An impressive record, and one that I hope they can add to in the future.

This week is going to be pretty self-indulgent. I’m going to spend a lot of time revisiting the good old days and profiling some of the prominent figures from this time period. I don’t want to completely neglect the Parma of today, but there are so many good memories to look back on.

Starting tomorrow I’ll be taking a closer look at some of my favourite Parma players, teams and managers. I’ve no idea how many I’ll get through but there are literally dozens of things I want to write about this week. Lets see how I do.

Read Full Post »

Firstly, I apologise for the disintegration of “Siena Week”. I really had intended on spending more time with the Robur and I didn’t mean to abandon them, but I simply ran out of time last week. Social events pulled me away from the computer and I barely had time to even get online (let alone research and post). Although I got a decent amount of Siena work done it was nowhere near as much as I’d wanted, so I’ll probably make them the first club I revisit when the fixtures repeat. Anyway…

This week’s feature club are Parma. I’ve been looking forward to writing about the Gialloblu since I started the blog and I thought I’d treat myself after two tough research weeks. I’ve always had a fondness for Parma since first getting into Italian football in the ’90’s. They were one of the first teams to catch my imagination on Football Italia and I have lots of great memories of some of the fantastic players they had back in the day. Really looking forward to revisiting these sides and taking a closer look at Zola, Chiesa, Cannavaro & co.

More from me tomorrow.

Read Full Post »